Attractions

Walter Auto Group "Muscle on Main"

Walter Auto Group "Muscle on Main"

     Muscle on Main Welcome to the 3 Time Award Winning event, Muscle on Main 2017 is going to bring new activities to the event that are even more family friendly.  Bring your children and allow them to participate in the Kids Fun Zone, which will all take place in the Pikeville City Park.  The Kids Fun Zone will consist of Corn hole contest, sponsorsed by Long John Silvers, Inflatables & Rides for all ages.  We invite you to see for yourself why this event won the Judge’s Recognition Award more than once! A big shout out to The Good Ole’ Boys Car Club & The Appalachian Street Rods for their hard work and dedication with this event. Come out this year and enjoy cars, family, food, and fun!

     Afterword’s, be sure to make your way to the Wrightway Raceway in the River Fill for some exciting drag racing action..

THE 2017 SEASON SCHEDULE BE POSTED SOON!!   

 

Hours of Operation:
2017 SEASON TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON
ADDRESS:
Pikeville City Park
Pikeville,KY
41501

Pikeville's Drag Racing Series

Pikeville's Drag Racing Series

2017 Pikeville's Drag Racing Schedule Will be Posted Soon!!   

We are working on 2017 Schedule and list of events, so stay tuned for from information

Hours of Operation:
2nd Saturday, May thru October
ADDRESS:
Wrightway Raceway
Pikeville,KY
41501

White Lightning Zip Line

White Lightning Zip Line

Come and enjoy the Mountains of Eastern Ky on the White Lightning Zip lines! Zip across 8 lines up to 1000' long!  Learn about the history of the area from the Hatfield & McCoy Feud to Running Moonshine in these here moutains!

Please plan to arrive at least 15 minutes before your departure time, So we can suit you up and give you a little training before your trip...

CLOSED FOR THE 2016 SEASON!!

COME SEE US NEXT YEAR!!

For more information call Hatfield McCoy Adventures Office at 606-424-0321 or 606-422-3107

Because safety is very important to us here are a few things to remember:

- Zip line rides in all weather with the exception of lightning and high wind.  If tour must be cancelled rain checks will be issued.  
- Maximum weight is 250lbs
- Minimum weight is 70lbs
- The minimum age is 8 years old 
- Closed-toed shoes are required 
- Riders under 18 must be accompanied by parent or guardian 
- Riders must follow all posted safety rules and regulations
- No one under the influence of alcohol or drugs will be permitted to ride
- Riders must be in good physical health and will be required to walk and climb steps

Hours of Operation:
Open Friday Saturday & Sunday& by Special Appointment
ADDRESS:
500 Bob Amos Drive
Pikeville,KY
41501

Jenny Wiley Theatre

Jenny Wiley Theatre

Our Mission:

Our mission is to enhance the quality of life in eastern Kentucky by providing professional theatre and exceptional educational opportunities in the performing arts. 

Jenny Wiley Theatre is eastern Kentucky's only professional theatre offering year round productions.  Since 1964, summers have been magical under the stars at the Jenny Wiley Amphitheatre, located in the beautiful Jenny Wiley State Park in Prestonsburg. In 2014, our new Mainstage indoor theatre opened in Pikeville.  Located at the corner of Second Street and Division Street, this facility offers productions on a year-round basis.  Our Pikeville location is the result of a partnership with the City of Pikeville.

 

JWT is a non-profit organization and receives funding from individuals, corporations, charitable foundations, the Prestonsburg Convention Center and Visitors Bureau, The City of Pikeville, The Kentucky Arts Council, and The Kentucky Department of Travel. The Kentucky Arts Council which is the State Arts Agency, supports Jenny Wiley Theatre with state tax dollars and federal funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Hours of Operation:
Depends on Show Times
ADDRESS:
218 2nd St
Pikeville,KY
41501

Hillbilly Days Festival

Hillbilly Days Festival

Come enjoy the festivities and craziness of Hillbilly Days and bring the whole family! There is something for everyone with hundreds of food and craft booths, a huge carnival, and music throughout the town. Y'all will be assured of having three days of outrageous fun, food, and frolic, and dont forget to come dressed up as a Hillbilly.  Hillbilly Days offers loads of fun for all participants, but there is true meaning behind the event. For 40 years, Shriners have faithfully traveled all over the United States and Canada to help crippled children. So, when you come upon Shriners all decked out in Hillbilly garb or driving one of those modified Hillbilly limousines, remember the children whose lives are being enhanced. Hillbilly days improves each year as Shriners, the Southeast Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, Pike County Government, City of Pikeville and local volunteers transform downtown Pikeville into one of the most unique festivals in the world!

Hours of Operation:
April 20, 21, & 22, 2017
ADDRESS:
Hambley Blvd.
Pikeville,KY
41501

York House

York House

The Pikeville City Commission felt that rehabilitating the house would be an excellent opportunity to preserve a piece of history which would become a place to promote and enhance our heritage. The Dils/York House will be a center for cultural learning experiences through historical displays, heritage education and interactive arts. It will be open to the community and will offer visitors unique historical and educational exhibits. In January 2017, the City of Pikeville and Pikeville City Commission in partnership with the University of Pikeville will open the doors of the Dils/York Cultural & Heritage Center to an exhibit of biblical artifacts from Israel which will remain on display thru June 2017. The exhibit is named Khirbet el-Maqatir & a Journey through Biblical History and is a walk through exhibition of approximately 200 artifacts from ancient Israel & Jordan.  Visitors will discover artifacts dating from as far back as 3,000 BC throughout history down to the time of Christ.  Within the wider scope of Biblical history visitors will also learn in detail about the archaeology excavations at the site of Khirbet el-Maqatir.  The evidence from the site indicates that Khirbet el-Maqatir is the Biblical fortress of Ai - famous from the story of the Israelite conquest recorded in the book of Joshua.  Artifacts from this site are on loan from the government of Israel and are unlikely to ever be exhibited again in the United States once they return to Israel. The Pikeville City Commission is eagerly looking forward to seeing the exhibit and greatly appreciates the University of Pikeville’s collaboration and coordinating the display at the Dils/York Heritage and Cultural Center. An exhibit of such immense importance brings a once in a life time viewing experience to the community, visitors and schools in and around Pikeville which meets the mission of the center.

Hours of Operation:
ADDRESS:
Main Street
Pikeville,KY
41501

Hatfield & McCoy

Hatfield & McCoy

The Hatfields and McCoys. Mere mention of their names stirs up visions of a lawless family feud. It evokes gun-toting vigilantes hell-bent on defending their kinfolk, igniting bitter grudges that would span generations. Yet many people familiar with these surnames may know little about the faded history of these two families and the legends they inspired. Who were the Hatfields and McCoys, and what was the source of this vicious and violent clash between the families?

During the most heated years of the feud, each family was ruled by a well-known patriarch. William Anderson Hatfield, known as “Devil Anse,” had the appearance of a backwoods, rough-hewn mountain dweller. By the 1870s Devil Anse was an increasingly successful timber merchant who employed dozens of men, including some McCoys. On the other side of the feud stood Randolph “Old Ranel” McCoy. Though not as prosperous as Devil Anse, Randolph owned some land and livestock. Both families lived along the Tug Fork of the Big Sandy River, which snaked along the boundary between Kentucky and West Virginia, and both families had complex kinship and social networks. Family loyalty was often determined not only by blood but by employment and proximity. The families even intermarried and sometimes switched family loyalties, even once the feud had started.

The first event in the decades-long feud was the 1865 murder of Randolph’s brother, Asa Harmon McCoy, by the Logan Wildcats, a local militia group that counted Devil Anse and other Hatfields among its members. Many people—even members of his own family—regarded Asa Harmon, who had served in the Union Army during the American Civil War, as a traitor. While some have surmised that his murder set the stage for the feud, most historians now see this incident as a standalone event.

Relations between the two families continued to sour over the next decade before flaring again over a seemingly small matter: a dispute over a single hog. In 1878 Randolph McCoy accused Floyd Hatfield, a cousin of Devil Anse, of stealing one of his pigs, a valuable commodity in the poor region. Floyd Hatfield’s trial took place in McCoy territory but was presided over by a cousin of Devil Anse. It hinged on the testimony of star witness Bill Staton, a McCoy relative married to a Hatfield. Staton testified in Floyd Hatfield’s favor, and the McCoys were infuriated when Floyd was cleared of the charges against him.

Two years later, Staton was violently killed in a fracas with Sam and Paris McCoy, nephews of Randolph. Sam stood trial for the murder but was acquitted for self-defense reasons. Within months of Station’s murder, a heated affair of a different sort was set ablaze. At a local election day gathering in 1880, Johnse Hatfield, the 18-year-old son of Devil Anse, encountered Roseanna McCoy, Randolph’s daughter. According to accounts, Johnse and Roseanna hit it off, disappearing together for hours. Supposedly fearing retaliation from her family for mingling with the Hatfields, Roseanna stayed at the Hatfield residence for a period of time, Randolph McCoy was said to have dis-owned his own daughter for this reason. Although they certainly shared a romance, it rapidly became clear that Johnse was not about to settle down with Roseanna. Several months later he abandoned the pregnant Roseanna and quickly moved on. In May 1881 he married Nancy McCoy, Roseanna’s cousin. According to the romanticized legend, Roseanna was heartbroken by these events and never recovered emotionally. The real turning point in the feud, according to most historical accounts, occurred on another local election day in August 1882. Three of Randolph McCoy’s sons ended up in a violent dispute with two brothers of Devil Anse. The fight soon snowballed into chaos as one of the McCoy brothers stabbed Ellison Hatfield multiple times and then shot him in the back. Authorities soon apprehended the McCoys, but the Hatfields intercepted them and took them from the law and lead the men to Hatfield territory.

Devil Anse told everybody that he would kill the McCoy boys if his brother died, this worried Mrs McCoy as she thought she would never get to see her boys again, she was allowed to bring her boys some home made food and then Devil Anse told Mrs McCoy that he would bring her boys back to Kentucky alive either way, even if his brother died. After receiving word that Ellison had died, Devil Anse and his clan took the McCoy boys back across the river to Kentucky and then they bound the McCoys to some pawpaw bushes and moved back across the river. Within minutes, they fired more than 50 shots, killing all three brothers. Though the Hatfields might have felt their revenge was warranted, the law felt otherwise, quickly returning indictments against 20 men, including Devil Anse and his sons. Despite the charges, the Hatfields eluded arrest, leaving the McCoys boiling with anger about the murders and outraged that the Hatfields walked free. Their cause was taken up by Perry Cline, an attorney who was married to Martha McCoy, the widow of Randolph’s brother Asa Harmon. Years earlier Cline had lost a lawsuit against Devil Anse over the deed for thousands of acres of land, and many historians believe this left him looking for his own form of revenge. Using his political connections, Cline had the charges against the Hatfields reinstated. He announced rewards for the arrest of the Hatfields, including Devil Anse. With the pressure cooker gathering steam, the media started to report on the feud in 1887. In their accounts, the Hatfields were often portrayed as violent backwoods hillbillies who roamed the mountains stirring up violence. The sensationalist coverage planted the seed for the rivalry to become cemented in the American imagination. What had been a local story was becoming a national legend.

The Hatfields may or may not have been paying attention to these stories, but they were certainly paying attention to the bounty on their heads. In an effort to end the commotion once and for all, a group of the Hatfields and their supporters hatched a plan to attack Randolph McCoy and his family. Led by Devil Anse’s son Cap and ally Jim Vance, a group of Hatfield men ambushed the McCoys’ home on New Year’s Day in 1888. Randolph fled, escaping into the woods. His son Calvin and daughter Alifair were killed in the crossfire; his wife Sarah was left badly beaten by the Hatfields, suffering a crushed skull. A few days after what became known as the New Year’s massacre, bounty hunter Frank Phillips chased down Jim Vance and Cap Hatfield, killing Vance. Phillips rounded up nine Hatfield family members and supporters and hauled them off to jail. Years of legal trials unfolded as a series of courts judged the legal merits of the Hatfield case. Eventually, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which decided that the Hatfields being held in custody could be tried. The trial began in 1889, and in the end, eight of the Hatfields and their supporters were sentenced to life in prison. Ellison Mounts, who was believed to be the son of Ellison Hatfield, was sentenced to death. Nicknamed Cottontop, Mounts was known to be mentally challenged, and many viewed him as a scapegoat even though he had confessed his guilt. Although public executions were against the law in Kentucky, thousands of spectators gathered to witness the hanging of Ellison Mounts on February 18, 1890.

Reports claim that his last words were: “They made me do it! The Hatfields made me do it!” As the feud faded, both family leaders attempted to recede into relative obscurity. Randolph McCoy became a ferry operator. In 1914 he died at the age of 88 from burns suffered in an accidental fire. By all accounts, he continued to be haunted by the deaths of his children. Devil Anse Hatfield, who had long proclaimed his skepticism about religion, was born again later in life when he was baptized for the first time at age 73. Although the conflict subsided generations ago, the names Hatfield and McCoy continue to loom large in the American imagination.

Hours of Operation:
ADDRESS:
Main Street
Pikeville,KY
41501

Bob Amos Park

Bob Amos Park

Bob Amos Park Attraction

Hours of Operation:
ADDRESS:
Bob Amos Park
Pikeville,KY
41501

Pikeville Commons

Pikeville Commons

List all that Pikeville Commons has to offer.

Hours of Operation:
ADDRESS:
Pikeville Commons
Pikeville,KY
41501

Big Sandy Heritage Center Museum

Big Sandy Heritage Center Museum

The Big Sandy Heritage Center preserves the history of the Big Sandy Valley. Located in downtown Pikeville, listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is one of the properties listed on the downtown walking tour. Antebellum decades, farming, coal, floods, frontier era, transportation, illegal liquor, personalities, moving mountains and the Hatfield & McCoy Feud are only a few of the displays you will see as you step back in time.

Prices: $2.00-$3.00.

Hours of Operation:
Wednesday through Friday 11-6 Saturday 10-4
ADDRESS:
172 Division Street,
Pikeville,KY
41501

Eastern Kentucky Exposition Center

Eastern Kentucky Exposition Center

An SMG managed facility, Eastern Kentucky Expo Center is Eastern Kentucky’s center for culture, education and entertainment. The Expo Center is the premier venue for entertainment and conferences and is located in the heart of downtown Pikeville. A 7,000 seat arena over 26,000 sq. feet in size that consists of an event level, main concourses, upper level, concession stands, boardrooms, and more.

Hours of Operation:
ADDRESS:
126 MAIN STREET
Pikeville,KY
41501